Kama Sutra

  • TRANSLATOR'S NOTES
    - Preface
    - Introduction

  • PART I: INTRODUCTORY
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V

  • PART II: ON SEXUAL UNION
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V
    - Chapter VI
    - Chapter VII
    - Chapter VIII
    - Chapter IX
    - Chapter X

  • PART III: ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V

  • PART IV: ABOUT A WIFE
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II

  • PART V: ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER PEOPLE
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V
    - Chapter VI

  • PART VI: ABOUT COURTESANS
    - Introductory Remarks - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V
    - Chapter VI

  • PART VII: ON THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO ONE'S SELF
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II

  • CONCLUDING REMARKS

  • MODERN KAMA SUTRA



  • PART VI
    CHAPTER V
    Of different kinds of Gain


    When a courtesan wants to keep some particular man from some other woman; or wishes to get him away from some woman to whom he may be attached or to deprive some woman of the gains realized by her from him; or if she thinks that she would raise her position or enjoy some great good fortune or become desirable to all men by uniting herself with this man; or if she wishes to get his assistance in averting some misfortune; or is really attached to him and loves him; or wishes to injure some body through his means; or has regard to some former favour conferred upon her by him; or wishes to be united with him merely from desire; for any of the above reasons, she should agree to take from him only a small sum of money in a friendly way.

    When a courtesan intends to abandon a particular lover, and take up with another one; or when she has reason to believe that her lover will shortly leave her, and return to his wives; or that having squandered all his money, and become penniless, his guardian, or master, or father would come and take him away; or that her lover is about to lose his position or, lastly, that he is of a very fickle mind, she should, under any of these circumstances, endeavour to get as much money as she can from him as soon as possible.

    On the other hand, when the courtesan thinks that her lover is about to receive valuable presents; or get a place of authority from the king; or be near the time of inheriting a fortune; or that his ship would soon arrive laden with merchandise; or that he has large stocks of corn and other commodities; or that if anything was done for him it would not be done in vain; or that he is always true to his word; then should she have regard to her future welfare, and live with the man like a wife.

    There are also verses on the subject as follows:

    `In considering her present gains, and her future welfare, a courtesan should avoid such persons as have gained their means of subsistence with very great difficulty, as also those who have become selfish and hard-hearted by becoming the favourites of kings.'

    `She should make every endeavour to unite herself with prosperous and well-to-do people, and with those whom it is dangerous to avoid, or to slight in any way. Even at some cost to herself she should become acquainted with energetic and liberal-minded men, who when pleased would give her a large sum of money, even for very little service, or for some small thing.'



    Kama Sutra