Kama Sutra

  • TRANSLATOR'S NOTES
    - Preface
    - Introduction

  • PART I: INTRODUCTORY
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V

  • PART II: ON SEXUAL UNION
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V
    - Chapter VI
    - Chapter VII
    - Chapter VIII
    - Chapter IX
    - Chapter X

  • PART III: ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V

  • PART IV: ABOUT A WIFE
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II

  • PART V: ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER PEOPLE
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V
    - Chapter VI

  • PART VI: ABOUT COURTESANS
    - Introductory Remarks - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V
    - Chapter VI

  • PART VII: ON THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO ONE'S SELF
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II

  • CONCLUDING REMARKS

  • MODERN KAMA SUTRA



  • PART VI
    CHAPTER III
    Of the Means of getting Money; of the Signs of a Lover who is beginning to be Weary, and of the way to get rid of him


  • Openly opposing her mother when she endeavours to persuade her to take up with men with whom she has been formerly acquainted, on account of the great gains to be got from them.
  • Lastly, pointing out to her lover the liberality of his rivals.
  • Thus end the ways and means of getting money.
  • A woman should always know the state of the mind, of the feelings, and of the disposition of her lover towards her from the changes of his temper, his manner, and the colour of his face.

    The behaviour of a waning lover is as follows:

  • He gives the woman either less than is wanted, or something else than that which is asked for.
  • He keeps her in hopes by promises.
  • He pretends to do one thing, and does something else.
  • He does not fulfil her desires.
  • He forgets his promises, or does something else than that which he has promised.
  • He speaks with his own servants in a mysterious way.
  • He sleeps in some other house under the pretence of having to do something for a friend.
  • Lastly, he speaks in private with the attendants of a woman with whom he was formerly acquainted.
  • Now when a courtesan finds that her lover's disposition towards her is changing, she should get possession of all his best things before he becomes aware of her intentions, and allow a supposed creditor to take them away forcibly from her in satisfaction of some pretended debt. After this, if the lover is rich, and has always behaved well towards her, she should ever treat him with respect; but if he is poor and destitute, she should get rid of him as if she had never been acquainted with him in any way before.

    The means of getting rid of a lover are as follows:

  • Describing the habits and vices of the lover as disagreeable and censurable, with the sneer of the lip, and the stamp of the foot.
  • Speaking on a subject with which he is not acquainted.
  • Showing no admiration for his learning, and passing a censure upon it.
  • Putting down his pride.
  • Seeking the company of men who are superior to him in learning and wisdom.
  • Showing a disregard for him on all occasions.
  • Censuring men possessed of the same faults as her lover.
  • Expressing dissatisfaction at the ways and means of enjoyment used by him.
  • Not giving him her mouth to kiss.
  • Refusing access to her jaghana, i.e. the part of the body between the navel and the thighs.
  • Showing a dislike for the wounds made by his nails and teeth.
  • Not pressing close up against him at the time when he embraces her.
  • Keeping her limbs without movement at the time of congress.
  • Desiring him to enjoy her when he is fatigued.

  • Kama Sutra