Kama Sutra

  • TRANSLATOR'S NOTES
    - Preface
    - Introduction

  • PART I: INTRODUCTORY
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V

  • PART II: ON SEXUAL UNION
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V
    - Chapter VI
    - Chapter VII
    - Chapter VIII
    - Chapter IX
    - Chapter X

  • PART III: ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V

  • PART IV: ABOUT A WIFE
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II

  • PART V: ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER PEOPLE
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V
    - Chapter VI

  • PART VI: ABOUT COURTESANS
    - Introductory Remarks - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V
    - Chapter VI

  • PART VII: ON THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO ONE'S SELF
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II

  • CONCLUDING REMARKS

  • MODERN KAMA SUTRA



  • PART IV
    CHAPTER I
    On the manner of living of a virtuous woman, and of her behaviour during the absence of her husband


    When the wife wants to approach her husband in private her dress should consist of many ornaments, various kinds of flowers, and a cloth decorated with different colours, and some sweet-smelling ointments or unguents. But her everyday dress should be composed of a thin, close-textured cloth, a few ornaments and flowers, and a little scent, not too much. She should also observe the fasts and vows of her husband, and when he tries to prevent her doing this, she should persuade him to let her do it.

    At appropriate times of the year, and when they happen to be cheap, she should buy earth, bamboos, firewood, skins, and iron pots, as also salt and oil. Fragrant substances, vessels made of the fruit of the plant wrightea antidysenterica, or oval leaved wrightea, medicines, and other things which are always wanted, should be obtained when required and kept in a secret place of the house. The seeds of the radish, the potato, the common beet, the Indian wormwood, the mango, the cucumber, the egg plant, the kushmanda, the pumpkin gourd, the surana, the bignonia indica, the sandal wood, the premna spinosa, the garlic plant, the onion, and other vegetables, should be bought and sown at the proper seasons. The wife, moreover, should not tell to strangers the amount of her wealth, nor the secrets which her husband has confided to her. She should surpass all the women of her own rank in life in her cleverness, her appearance, her knowledge of cookery, her pride, and her manner of serving her husband. The expenditure of the year should be regulated by the profits. The milk that remains after the meals should be turned into ghee or clarified butter. Oil and sugar should be prepared at home; spinning and weaving should also be done there; and a store of ropes and cords, and barks of trees for twisting into ropes should be kept. She should also attend to the pounding and cleaning of rice, using its small grain and chaff in some way or other. She should pay the salaries of the servants, look after the tilling of the fields, and keeping of the flocks and herds, superintend the making of vehicles, and take care of the rams, cocks, quails, parrots, starlings, cuckoos, peacocks, monkeys, and deer; and finally adjust the income and expenditure of the day. The worn-out clothes should be given to those servants who have done good work, in order to show them that their services have been appreciated, or they may be applied to some other use. The vessels in which wine is prepared, as well as those in which it is kept, should be carefully looked after, and put away at the proper time. All sales and purchases should also be well attended to. The friends of her husband she should welcome by presenting them with flowers, ointment, incense, betel leaves, and betel nut. Her father-in-law and mother-in-law she should treat as they deserve, always remaining dependent on their will, never contradicting them, speaking to them in few and not harsh words, not laughing loudly in their presence, and acting with their friends and enemies as with her own. In addition to the above she should not be vain, or too much taken up with her enjoyments. She should be liberal towards her servants, and reward them on holidays and festivals; and not give away anything without first making it known to her husband.

    Thus ends the manner of living of a virtuous woman.



    Kama Sutra