Kama Sutra

  • TRANSLATOR'S NOTES
    - Preface
    - Introduction

  • PART I: INTRODUCTORY
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V

  • PART II: ON SEXUAL UNION
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V
    - Chapter VI
    - Chapter VII
    - Chapter VIII
    - Chapter IX
    - Chapter X

  • PART III: ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V

  • PART IV: ABOUT A WIFE
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II

  • PART V: ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER PEOPLE
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V
    - Chapter VI

  • PART VI: ABOUT COURTESANS
    - Introductory Remarks - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V
    - Chapter VI

  • PART VII: ON THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO ONE'S SELF
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II

  • CONCLUDING REMARKS

  • MODERN KAMA SUTRA



  • PART I
    CHAPTER VI
    Footnotes


    13. The public women, or courtesans (Vesya), of the early Hindoos have often been compared with the Hetera of the Greeks. The subject is dealt with at some length in H. H. Wilson's Select Specimens of the Theatre of the Hindoos, in two volumes, Trubner and Co., 1871. It may be fairly considered that the courtesan was one of the elements, and an important element too, of early Hindoo society, and that her education and intellect were both superior to that of the women of the household. Wilson says, `By the Vesya or courtesan, however, we are not to understand a female who has disregarded the obligation of law or the precepts of virtue, but a character reared by a state of manners unfriendly to the admission of wedded females into society, and opening it only at the expense of reputation to women who were trained for association with men by personal and mental acquirements to which the matron was a stranger.'

    14. According to this description a Pithamarda would be a sort of professor of all the arts, and as such received as the friend and confidant of the citizen

    15. A seat in the form of the letter T.

    16. The Vita is supposed to represent somewhat the character of the Parasite of the Greek comedy. It is possible that he was retained about the person of the wealthy and dissipated as a kind of private instructor, as well as an entertaining companion.

    17. Vidushaka is evidently the buffoon and jester. Wilson says of him that he is the humble companion, not the servant, of a prince or man of rank, and it is a curious peculiarity that he is always a Brahman. He bears more affinity to Sancho Panza, perhaps than any other character in western fiction, imitating him in his combination of shrewdness and simplicity, his fondness of good living and his love of ease. In the dramas of intrigue he exhibits some of the talents of Mercury, but with less activity and ingenuity, and occasionally suffers by his interference. According to the technical definition of his attributes he is to excite mirth by being ridiculous in person, age, and attire.

    18. This means, it is presumed, that the citizen should be acquainted with several languages. The middle part of this paragraph might apply to the Nihilists and Fenians of the day, or to secret societies. It was perhaps a reference to the Thugs.



    Kama Sutra