Kama Sutra

  • TRANSLATOR'S NOTES
    - Preface
    - Introduction

  • PART I: INTRODUCTORY
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V

  • PART II: ON SEXUAL UNION
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V
    - Chapter VI
    - Chapter VII
    - Chapter VIII
    - Chapter IX
    - Chapter X

  • PART III: ABOUT THE ACQUISITION OF A WIFE
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V

  • PART IV: ABOUT A WIFE
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II

  • PART V: ABOUT THE WIVES OF OTHER PEOPLE
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V
    - Chapter VI

  • PART VI: ABOUT COURTESANS
    - Introductory Remarks - Chapter I
    - Chapter II
    - Chapter III
    - Chapter IV
    - Chapter V
    - Chapter VI

  • PART VII: ON THE MEANS OF ATTRACTING OTHERS TO ONE'S SELF
    - Chapter I
    - Chapter II

  • CONCLUDING REMARKS

  • MODERN KAMA SUTRA



  • TRANSLATOR' S NOTES
    Introduction


    It may be interesting to some persons to learn how it came about that Vatsyayana was first brought to light and translated into the English language. It happened thus. While translating with the pundits the `Anunga Runga, or the stage of love', reference was frequently found to be made to one Vatsya. The sage Vatsya was of this opinion, or of that opinion. The sage Vatsya said this, and so on. Naturally questions were asked who the sage was, and the pundits replied that Vatsya was the author of the standard work on love in Sanscrit literature, that no Sanscrit library was complete without his work, and that it was most difficult now to obtain in its entire state. The copy of the manuscript obtained in Bombay was defective, and so the pundits wrote to Benares, Calcutta and Jeypoor for copies of the manuscript from Sanscrit libraries in those places. Copies having been obtained, they were then compared with each other, and with the aid of a Commentary called `Jayamangla' a revised copy of the entire manuscript was prepared, and from this copy the English translation was made. The following is the certificate of the chief pundit:

    `The accompanying manuscript is corrected by me after comparing four different copies of the work. I had the assistance of a Commentary called "Jayamangla" for correcting the portion in the first five parts, but found great difficulty in correcting the remaining portion, because, with the exception of one copy thereof which was tolerably correct, all the other copies I had were far too incorrect. However, I took that portion as correct in which the majority of the copies agreed with each other.'

    The `Aphorisms on Love' by Vatsyayana contain about one thousand two hundred and fifty slokas or verses, and are divided into parts, parts into chapters, and chapters into paragraphs. The whole consists of seven parts, thirty-six chapters, and sixty-four paragraphs. Hardly anything is known about the author. His real name is supposed to be Mallinaga or Mrillana, Vatsyayana being his family name. At the close of the work this is what he writes about himself:

    `After reading and considering the works of Babhravya and other ancient authors, and thinking over the meaning of the rules given by them, this treatise was composed, according to the precepts of the Holy Writ, for the benefit of the world, by Vatsyayana, while leading the life of a religious student at Benares, and wholly engaged in the contemplation of the Deity. This work is not to be used merely as an instrument for satisfying our desires. A person acquainted with the true principles of this science, who preserves his Dharma (virtue or religious merit), his Artha (worldly wealth) and his Kama (pleasure or sensual gratification), and who has regard to the customs of the people, is sure to obtain the mastery over his senses. In short, an intelligent and knowing person attending to Dharma and Artha and also to Kama, without becoming the slave of his passions, will obtain success in everything that he may do.'



    Kama Sutra